Dandelion bhaji and salad recipe

I have always loved foraging and free food. You must however make sure you pick from a clean location where no herbicides or pesticides have been used. If you are not 100% sure of a plant’s identity, do not pick it. And always leave some for the bees.

Dandelions are beautiful, useful little plants (yes, beautiful. The designation ‘weeds’ is a marketing ploy to flog weedkillers which can blind you if you get them in your eyes and garden tools which look like instruments of mediaeval torture). And they are delicious to eat. We need to rethink our garden priorities. Just imagine you hold the National Collection of dandelions and be proud!

Dandelion means ‘lion’s teeth’ although I have always thought lion’s mane would be a better name. In French they are pissenlit: from pisse-en-lit – wet-the-bed, the old Highland nickname too. I remember echoes of this in my Highland primary school when the Bad Boys used to chase us with dandelions, shrieking with glee, if they touched us with one, that we were going to wake up to soggy sheets.

There is a useful folk-memory here though as the dandelion plant is a diuretic and helps eliminate water retention. The long (and loathed) tap-roots were once washed, roasted and ground as a sort of coffee during the World Wars. And if well made, dandelion wine is a pale golden joy which releases a fragrant early summer bouquet, even in the depths of winter.

METHOD

To make bhajis for 3 – 4 people you will need a large mixing bowl, 12 dandelion heads picked in bright sunlight, a spoonful of curry paste, a large finely chopped onion or leek, a good cupful of flour (half plain, half self-raising) and two lightly beaten eggs, plus a little sunflower oil and a little butter for cooking.

If you have no curry paste, you can use freshly grated ginger, finely chopped garlic, finely chopped chilli or pwder to taste, ground cardomum, cumin and turmeric instead – fry together lightly then add at the flour stage before the egg.

1. Wash your dandelion heads and pat dry. Pick the golden ‘teeth’ away from the green ‘head’ and place in a large bowl. Add the flour and onion and mix until evenly distributed. Beat the curry paste into the egg and then pour into the flour mixture. Mix thoroughly until it forms a loose dough.

2. Drop tablespoonfuls into hot oil/butter mixture in a frying pan and cook until golden brown on all sides. It will take 4 – 5 minutes at most. Keep cooked ones warm as the others sizzle away.

For the salad allow 6 young dandelion leaves per person (they look like swords with serrated edges) and wash and dry well. Add a few crumbled walnuts, a finely chopped apple and some chopped hard boiled egg or blue cheese if liked.

Make a creamy dressing with a spoonful of mayonnaise, half a cupful of olive or good rapeseed oil, quarter of a cupful of balsamic vinegar, the juice of a lemon, a teaspoon each of honey and Dijon mustard. Place in a warm dry jam jar and shake vigorously – then pour over the salad and serve with the warm, crisp golden brown bhaji.

Bon appetit!

If you fancy trying this recipe, please first promise never to use herbicides or pesticides in your garden again…

Author: veewalkerwrites

Hello new readers! I am here to keep you company. Thousands of you have now begun your reading journey of my award-winning début novel Major Tom's War. It was launched at the National Army Museum in London on 20 September 2018 (the eve of Tom and Evie's 100th wedding anniversary) by my lovely publishers www.KashiHouse.com. The revised and expanded second edition is out now on Kindle, the paperback soon - in theory launching during a book tour of Canada late 2020. We will see... https://www.google.com/search?q=majortomswar+kindle&oq=majortomswar+kindle&aqs=chrome..69i57.11416j0j4&client=ms-android-samsung-ss&sourceid=chrome-mobile&ie=UTF-8#sbfbu=1&pi=majortomswar%20kindle

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